Summary of my off-the-cuff Maptime Presentation: Canadian Microwave Links

Screenshot from 2014-07-26 10:17:15@MaptimeTO asked me to summarize the brief talk I gave last week at Maptime Toronto on making maps from the Technical and Administrative Frequency List (TAFL) radio database. It was mostly taken from posts on this blog, but here goes:

  1. One of the many constraints in building wind farms is allowing for radio links. Both the radio and the wind industries have agreed on a process of buffering and consultation. Here’s how I handled it in Python: Making weird composite shapes with Shapely.
  2. The TAFL databases — which contains locations and technical data for all licensed transmitters — are now open data. You can find them here: Technical and Administrative Frequency List (TAFL).
  3. The format is a real delight for all legacy-data nerds: aka a horrible mess of conditional field widths and arcane numeric codes. I wrote a SpatiaLite SQL script to make sense of it all: scruss/taflmunge. This (kind of) explains what it does: TAFL — as a proper geodatabase.
  4. Here’s a raw dump (very little metadata, sorry) from 2013 in the wonderful uMap: Ontario Microwave Links.
  5. In a fabulous piece of #opendatafail, Industry Canada have migrated all the microwave data (so, all links ≥ 960 MHz) to a new system which doesn’t work yet, and also stripped out all of the microwave data from recent TAFL files. They claim to be fixing it, but don’t hold your breath. If you want data to play with, here’s Ontario’s data from October 2013 (nb: huge) — ltaf_ont_tafl-20131001.

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